#caa2013rock

So I’m here at the College Art Association annual meeting, and the session developed by Janice Robertson, Gale Levin, and Janhavi Pakrashi (all of Pratt Institute, NYC).  This is an alternative-format session:  open for tweeting, there is also an open mic going around the room as a “talking stick.”  Interesting to see, read, and hear what others are doing to “rock the boat” in their art history classrooms. Crowdsourcing the strategies…. A few points that strike me:

-If digital becomes the norm, then tweeting will no longer be rocking the boat, reading a book will be rocking the boat.

-Do students “shut down” when technology (power point) comes on?

-Redesigning the traditional observation paper — have the student take on a persona from the period.

-What to do with technology in a large class (50 students)?

– Create debate teams in class.

-Getting students to talk to each other instead of listening to lecture.

-Have students collaborate on powerpoint in class by throwing in images student pick to illustrate a point.

-Flipping the classroom.

-Team teaching with a colleague from a different discipline art history and folklore!)

-No long art history surveys!

-Using twitter to write a short description of a work.

-Incorporate your tech-savvy librarians into your teaching, your blog, your students’ work.

-Open-ended questions

-Some may prefer to tweet than speak

-Better to be involved than back away

-Many faculty are still unwilling to be involved with technology

-Technology takes a lot of time in class

-Drafting a syllabus/format for flipping the classroom

-How might online tools allow us to alter or flip the classroom

-Get the images to the students before they come to class

-Twitter isn’t the only tool, but can be a beginning of the discussion.

more to come….

 

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