Category Archives: Domain of One’s Own

10/4/17

§ Readings for today:

¶ President Paino’s Vision statement for UMW

“Investment of Hope” — 4 goals, each with action steps:

1.Service and social justice

2. Reconstitute the liberal arts for the digital age

3. “Immerse students in impactful learning experienes”

4. Diverse and conclusive community for success

What does a public institution look like with digital liberal arts?

¶ Bryan William Van Norden, “What’s with Nazis and Knights?” Huff Post, 9/19/17

¶ Nathan Heller, “What’s Roiling the Liberal Arts?” The Big Uneasy, The New Yorker, May 30, 2016

¶ Dorothy Kim, “Teaching Medieval Studies in a Time of White Supremacy,” In the Middle, August 28, 2017

¶ Dorothy Kim, “Race, Gender, Academia, and the Tactics of Digital Online Harassment,” SCS Newsletter (Sept. 2017), Medieval Studies and Harassment: https://classicalstudies.org/about/scs-newsletter-september-2017-medieval-studies-and-harassment

“This lack of a website has been a regular talking point for institutions and colleagues who have invited me out for lectures or workshops. It’s an inconvenience but one I plan to continue doing because of the mass of harassment I expect to get when Digital Whiteness and Medieval Studies (forthcoming, ArcPress/WMU) comes out as it discusses online white supremacy (white supremacists/white nationalists/KKK/MRA etc.).”

 

§ See also:

¶ DK mentioned: Being Black at Michigan

¶ stablish a Social Media Policy, SCS

¶ Rebecca Mead, “The Troll Slayer, A Cambridge classicist takes on her sexist detractors,” The New Yorker, Sept. 1, 2014.

¶ Mary Beard, “Women in Power”

¶ Sarah E. Bond, “Why we need to start seeing the Classical world in color,” Hyperallergic, June 7, 2017.

“Most museums and art history textbooks contain a predominantly neon white display of skin tone when it comes to classical statues and sarcophagi. This has an impact on the way we view the antique world. The assemblage of neon whiteness serves to create a false idea of homogeneity — everyone was very white! — across the Mediterranean region. The Romans, in fact, did not define people as “white”; where, then, did this notion of race come from?”

¶ Colleen Flaherty, “Threats for what she didn’t say,” Inside Higher Ed, June 19, 2017.

§ Pedagogical take-aways:

¶ Be patient, be diligent, teach awareness, have their back, support

9/20/17

More on canva.com:

Teaching materials

 

Other tools:

data.chronicle.com — for displaying date…and possibly adding data.

storymap — part of knight lab

storyline

Geosheets.com

Mapping Gothic France

 

For next week:

Troy’s Vision Statement

Mission of the Liberal Arts and Public Institutions: Roads Taken, Kid for Life

Changing nature of public and private

Changing role of public scholars

Moya, “The Ethics of Public Scholarship”

 

For the future:

Where is the internet?

Physicality of data?

Embodiment/Disembodiment

 

For today:

Digital Knowledge Faculty Initiative

The Work of Being Watched, Mark Andrejevic

“Recent developments in television technology can perhaps provide a more concrete example of how the work of being watched is deployed to rationalize the work of watching.” p. 239

Elahi Hasan

Tracking Transience — cannot copy link

Baltimore Sun

TED Talk — cannot copy link

The Circle (excerpt attached from Martha)

 

 

Tools 9/13/17

Canva.com — for designing; completely free; can download as a pdf.

TheNounProject.com — icons for everything

Pixlr.com — PhotoShop-lite

Unsplash — for photos, free, public domain images

DS106 — assignment bank

HERA: Historic Environment Resource Assessment, HISP UMW

H5P.com — a collection of tools that help you with other site.

H5P examples

knightlab.northwestern.edu — Juxtapose, Soundcite (add sound), Storymap (no collaboration), Timeline (create a Google spreadsheet; can collaborate with this); tools built for journalists

“It’s not the technology…it’s the teaching.” This isn’t always the case.

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World

For 9/13/17

Werner Herzog

“Will our children’s children’s children need the company of humans, or will they have evolved in a world where that’s not important?”

Lawrence Krauss, Cosmologist, Arizona State University

Teaching students to live with ambiguity

How does having the internet change our expectations of students?

Storytelling

“the web students bring me”

Sign up for a new app

Readings for 8/30/17

First meeting of Digital Knowledge, Domain of One’s Own, DTLT:

Is digital changing everything, or is knowledge changing the digital?

Art history reading on digital art history?

Domain Fellows, started by Martha Burtis – take DoOO out of the classroom and into their lives.

Ray Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains.” http://schoolsites.schoolworld.com/schools/Cheltenham/webpages/cmanser/files/there%20will%20come%20soft%20rains%20(bradbury)1.pdf

See also Bradbury’s  The Veldt The World the Children Made, first published in The Saturday Evening Post, September 23, 1950.

Audry Watters, The Web We Need to Give Students.” https://brightreads.com/the-web-we-need-to-give-students-311d97713713

An outsider looking in.

“Giving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.” Why is this radical?

David Weinberger, Small Pieces Loosley Joined (2002). http://www.smallpieces.com/

Werner Herzog, Lo and Behold, documentary.

Sarah Sze, “Triple Point,” 55th Venice Biennale 2013

Silentio Pathologia might be compared with Sarah Sze’s installation Triple Point at the U. S. Pavilion in the Giardini.

U.S. Pavilion, Giardini, Venice

U.S. Pavilion, Giardini, Venice

Sze has brought many thousands of things into the rooms and part of the landscape of the Pavilion. These things include cans of paint, pads of paper, mirrors, ladders, lamps, rocks, photographs, furniture, and countless other objects.

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There is little that connects these objects between rooms and no sense that rooms have been transformed.

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According to Sze, “[t]he title for the whole show, ‘Triple Point,’ refers to the situation where all three states of a substance—gas, liquid, and solid—can exist at once. So it’s this teetering between states, the fragility of equilibrium, and the constant desire to create stability and a sense of place that frame the narrative.” (Conversation between Sarah Sze and Rirkrit Tiravanija, “Thing Theories,” in ArtForum, summer 2013.)

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In the Pavilion, the things that constitute Triple Point speak less to the “fragility of equilibrium, [a] constant desire to create stability and a sense of place,” than an attempt to turn one’s garage into a kind of sci-fi stage. Certainly, there is the “ahhh” factor – some things move, shadows are cast, objects are organized by color — but this is mostly an accumulation of stuff built up or laid out.

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As an installation, Triple Point arouses a viewer’s curiosity and urges one to play with things. Silentio Pathologia, on the other hand, draws the visitor into a space wherein the physical and intellectual journeys are created by the objects, and one experiences these objects as a coherent environment.

Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva (Macedonia), “Silentio Pathologia,” 55th Venice Biennale 2013

The year is 1348. Europe is about to meet its worst enemy. Within a few years, nearly two-thirds of the population of the continent is dead. The cause? The Bubonic Plague. Rats were host bodies…where rats travelled, the plague followed. Cities, towns, rural areas all experienced horrific devastation and chaos. Those who survived the plague long-remembered this time as a period of sorrow, confusion, and absolute fear. In “Silentio Pathologia” the artist Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva considers the rapid movement of the plague in early modern Europe, and finds parallels to the transmission of viruses today.

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“Silentio Pathologia” encompasses the entire interior of the Scuola dei Laneri, the former confraternity of the wool workers in Venice. One might feel claustrophobic here were it not for the natural light streaming in from the expansive windows along the entrance wall. The location was a lucky find and adds a layer of meaning to interpretations of this work. Wool was one of the many products Venetians transported across early modern Europe, unwittingly playing a significant role in the transmission of plague.

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The visitor to the Scuola dei Laneri today also journeys. At the entrance of the Scuola one encounters the opening of a path marked by a metal wall about 10′ high at the left (two and a half tons of metal all told), and at the right a drape of silkworm cocoons threaded together. Here, one’s journey begins. The metal is imposing…most remains untouched but some areas show the effects of being worked in a circular motion by a grinder.

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The metal surface also receives the patterned shadows cast by the threaded cocoons. The visitor walks between the wall of metal and drape of cocoons in a vaguely circular journey that leads to new walls…one made of untreated black silk threads stitched together by Elpida…

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and the other wall a drape of albino rat pelts, also stitched together by the artist.

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In early modern Europe, rats were carriers of disease. Today they are among the most common living creatures in research labs for the study of disease. At the center of “Silentio Pathologia” are two cages with pet rats. As the artist explained, the rats need to be held and stroked every day, preferably by the same person because the rats become familiar with one’s scent and like it; this care insures that the rats remain tamed and do not revert to their wild state. At the heart of this journey we come face to face with a dilemma…taming our fears requires embracing them.

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Above:  Preston Thayer with the artist, Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva, at the 55th Venice Biennale, May 28, 2013, talking through the gauze of black silk thread.

Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva completed her MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London in 1998 and currently lives and works in Brighton, England. Her work was part of the 51st Venice Biennale in ArtSway’s New Forest Pavilion.  For more on Silentio Pathologia, see the artist’s blog at: http://blog.elpihv.co.uk/category/55th-venice-biennale/.

Silentio Pathologia was curated by Ana Frangovska, curator at the National Gallery of Macedonia, Skopje.

A expanded version of this post appears in The Art Section, (summer 2013, 7/6).

Online exhibits and digital art history

A way of thinking about online exhibits?  “The wind of commerce hit museums harder than many universities. In some instances necessity occasioned the creation of good websites as the public face of the institution (interest logged via hits per week); in others it provoked a rethink of the mission of museums and a dumbing down to a lower common denominator, in displays, special exhibitions, and websites. Museums are in a state of flux because of computers and the Web: can/should technology be applied to these dusty mausolea of out-of-context artifacts to provide a learned, multimedia, immersive context – the nearest thing now possible to reintegrating the works with the context from which they were removed? Or is the museum of the future to be a theme park, lacking any truly educational mission, with Web displays as part of the fun? Believers in culture should hope for the former; but, as the inscription on Wren’s tomb nearly has it, Si monumentum requiris, cinumclicke.

Indeed, should we extrapolate from the existence of the Web to the decline of campus-based universities and physical museums and galleries? If galleries can only display a small proportion of their collection at any one time, should not funding go into web-based image databases?”

Michael Greenhalgh, “Art History”

In A Companion to Digital Humanities, ed. Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/

 

Digital art history

Working now on digital art history.  Here are some resources:

Diane M. Zorich’s report to the Kress Foundation on the role of digital scholarship in art history;  “Transitioning to a Digital World:  Art History, Its Research Centers, and Digital Scholarship,” June 2012.

A post from Emory University’s Woodruff Library on Zorich’s report for the Kress Foundation.  Quick links here to digital art history projects cited in the report.

A post by Hasan Niyazi with references to recent discussions, December 2012.

Five participants in the Digital Art History Lab held March 5-7, 2013 at the Getty discuss the state of the field and the principles of networked scholarship:

• Hans Brandhorst, editor of the Iconclass system (http://www.iconclass.nl) and the Arkyves Web catalogue (http://www.arkyves.org/)

• Johanna Drucker, Bernard and Martin Breslauer Professor Bibliography in the Department of Information Studies and founder of the Digital Humanities program at UCLA

• Emily Pugh, Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art, and Web developer for the online journal Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide

• Nuria Rodríguez Ortega, chair of the Department of Art History at the University of Málaga, Spain

• Moderator: Susan Edwards, art historian and digital humanities technologist, J. Paul Getty Trust