9/20/17

More on canva.com:

Teaching materials

 

Other tools:

data.chronicle.com — for displaying date…and possibly adding data.

storymap — part of knight lab

storyline

Geosheets.com

Mapping Gothic France

 

For next week:

Troy’s Vision Statement

Mission of the Liberal Arts and Public Institutions: Roads Taken, Kid for Life

Changing nature of public and private

Changing role of public scholars

Moya, “The Ethics of Public Scholarship”

 

For the future:

Where is the internet?

Physicality of data?

Embodiment/Disembodiment

 

For today:

Digital Knowledge Faculty Initiative

The Work of Being Watched, Mark Andrejevic

“Recent developments in television technology can perhaps provide a more concrete example of how the work of being watched is deployed to rationalize the work of watching.” p. 239

Elahi Hasan

Tracking Transience — cannot copy link

Baltimore Sun

TED Talk — cannot copy link

The Circle (excerpt attached from Martha)

 

 

Tools 9/13/17

Canva.com — for designing; completely free; can download as a pdf.

TheNounProject.com — icons for everything

Pixlr.com — PhotoShop-lite

Unsplash — for photos, free, public domain images

DS106 — assignment bank

HERA: Historic Environment Resource Assessment, HISP UMW

H5P.com — a collection of tools that help you with other site.

H5P examples

knightlab.northwestern.edu — Juxtapose, Soundcite (add sound), Storymap (no collaboration), Timeline (create a Google spreadsheet; can collaborate with this); tools built for journalists

“It’s not the technology…it’s the teaching.” This isn’t always the case.

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World

For 9/13/17

Werner Herzog

“Will our children’s children’s children need the company of humans, or will they have evolved in a world where that’s not important?”

Lawrence Krauss, Cosmologist, Arizona State University

Teaching students to live with ambiguity

How does having the internet change our expectations of students?

Storytelling

“the web students bring me”

Sign up for a new app

Readings for 8/30/17

First meeting of Digital Knowledge, Domain of One’s Own, DTLT:

Is digital changing everything, or is knowledge changing the digital?

Art history reading on digital art history?

Domain Fellows, started by Martha Burtis – take DoOO out of the classroom and into their lives.

Ray Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains.” http://schoolsites.schoolworld.com/schools/Cheltenham/webpages/cmanser/files/there%20will%20come%20soft%20rains%20(bradbury)1.pdf

See also Bradbury’s  The Veldt The World the Children Made, first published in The Saturday Evening Post, September 23, 1950.

Audry Watters, The Web We Need to Give Students.” https://brightreads.com/the-web-we-need-to-give-students-311d97713713

An outsider looking in.

“Giving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.” Why is this radical?

David Weinberger, Small Pieces Loosley Joined (2002). http://www.smallpieces.com/

Werner Herzog, Lo and Behold, documentary.

A Venice site

I can imagine creating something like this with students about the city of Venice. The link is to The Virtual Lawn produced at the University of Virginia. There’s a great deal here that focuses on Jefferson and his architecture at UVA, but also the Renaissance architect Palladio, Humanism, ancient and Renaissance villas, and much more.

I also really like Frederic Kaplan’s Ted Talk on building an information time machine on the city of Venice. This would be a challenge here.

 

Venice 2014 online exhibit

The spring 2014 Venice seminar is learning Omeka for our online exhibit. Gradually, the site is developing. There’s a learning curve for everyone. Omeka is very different from the umwblogs/wordpress system used in the past. Other than being “online,” there isn’t much to carry over from earlier experiences.

The class is hoping to use the design format of the exhibit, “Some were neighbors,” from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. We’ll see if this is possible.

Here is a list of online exhibits we recently reviewed:

http://dp.la/exhibitions/exhibits/show/activism

http://www.historymuseum.ca/gwichin/introduction/the-gwichin/

http://www.york.ac.uk/history-of-art/virtual-exhibition/satireandthecity.html

http://www.statemuseum.arizona.edu/exhibits/frida/web/index.shtml

http://www.nli.ie/1916/1916_main.html

http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/drugtrade/

http://greenfield.brynmawr.edu/exhibits/browse

http://archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu/the-collection/object-stories/archaeology-of-daily-life/

http://www.lib.umd.edu/LAB/exhibits/leadingrole/index.html

http://www.lib.umd.edu/civilwarwomen/exhibition/introduction_womenwar.html

http://somewereneighbors.ushmm.org/#/exhibitions

http://66.147.244.104/~amerifl5/americanstories/

http://www.johnrogers-history.org/

DMCI proposal

My original proposal for participation in the Digital Media Commons Initiative at UMW:

“My seminars on Venice include an online exhibit; these are vehicles for art history majors to present research on the art, culture, history, and environment of this extraordinary city. (The exhibit from 2011 is available here.) The exhibits attract attention online, and this is rewarding for students. Nevertheless, there is no contact between our students and students elsewhere in the US or in Italy. This project aims to remove barriers by establishing connections with colleagues and students beyond UMW in the creation of a website on which students from several institutions could collaborate. My current Venice seminar and May study abroad program to Venice and Croatia can initiate these connections.

Art history is the study of visual communications over time. While art historians often work alone and in archives, we also work collaboratively and with the newest technologies. Art history at UMW supports both approaches. This project connects on-site archival study with online collaborative discoveries, and establishes connections that currently do not exist. I have not identified an online project like this elsewhere; its uniqueness and innovativeness would draw students to UMW, to the ITCC, and to the interdisciplinary study of art history. It is a natural fit for the ITCC because it speaks to the Center’s mission to “imagine, create, share, and learn.” The project re-imagines teaching and learning here at UMW as both a classroom and a global liberal arts experience. The ITCC will be an actual building, but it will also be a virtual space open to a global community with its heart at UMW.”

 

Sarah Sze, “Triple Point,” 55th Venice Biennale 2013

Silentio Pathologia might be compared with Sarah Sze’s installation Triple Point at the U. S. Pavilion in the Giardini.

U.S. Pavilion, Giardini, Venice

U.S. Pavilion, Giardini, Venice

Sze has brought many thousands of things into the rooms and part of the landscape of the Pavilion. These things include cans of paint, pads of paper, mirrors, ladders, lamps, rocks, photographs, furniture, and countless other objects.

IMG_4078

There is little that connects these objects between rooms and no sense that rooms have been transformed.

IMG_4094

According to Sze, “[t]he title for the whole show, ‘Triple Point,’ refers to the situation where all three states of a substance—gas, liquid, and solid—can exist at once. So it’s this teetering between states, the fragility of equilibrium, and the constant desire to create stability and a sense of place that frame the narrative.” (Conversation between Sarah Sze and Rirkrit Tiravanija, “Thing Theories,” in ArtForum, summer 2013.)

IMG_4095

In the Pavilion, the things that constitute Triple Point speak less to the “fragility of equilibrium, [a] constant desire to create stability and a sense of place,” than an attempt to turn one’s garage into a kind of sci-fi stage. Certainly, there is the “ahhh” factor – some things move, shadows are cast, objects are organized by color — but this is mostly an accumulation of stuff built up or laid out.

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As an installation, Triple Point arouses a viewer’s curiosity and urges one to play with things. Silentio Pathologia, on the other hand, draws the visitor into a space wherein the physical and intellectual journeys are created by the objects, and one experiences these objects as a coherent environment.