11/15/17

“…Nick Couldry, a British media scholar, who argues in his book Why Voice Matters that we are experiencing a contemporary crisis of voice—across political, economic, social domains.  At root, he argues, is a pervasive doctrine of neoliberalism that denies voice matters.”

Documentary studies — close reading, “close enough to hurt”

“Get proximate” to the social justice issues that need our attention

  • Audrey Watters, “The Web We Need to Give Students” (this is one of my favorite pieces about Domain of One’s Own — many of you may have already read it, but I figured I’d add it to the list in case)

Social Justice and education

What do our students’ domains look like after they leave the course in which it was created?

How do faculty use these in “later” classes?

Archive of our own

Digital minimalism

10/4/17

§ Readings for today:

¶ President Paino’s Vision statement for UMW

“Investment of Hope” — 4 goals, each with action steps:

1.Service and social justice

2. Reconstitute the liberal arts for the digital age

3. “Immerse students in impactful learning experienes”

4. Diverse and conclusive community for success

What does a public institution look like with digital liberal arts?

¶ Bryan William Van Norden, “What’s with Nazis and Knights?” Huff Post, 9/19/17

¶ Nathan Heller, “What’s Roiling the Liberal Arts?” The Big Uneasy, The New Yorker, May 30, 2016

¶ Dorothy Kim, “Teaching Medieval Studies in a Time of White Supremacy,” In the Middle, August 28, 2017

¶ Dorothy Kim, “Race, Gender, Academia, and the Tactics of Digital Online Harassment,” SCS Newsletter (Sept. 2017), Medieval Studies and Harassment: https://classicalstudies.org/about/scs-newsletter-september-2017-medieval-studies-and-harassment

“This lack of a website has been a regular talking point for institutions and colleagues who have invited me out for lectures or workshops. It’s an inconvenience but one I plan to continue doing because of the mass of harassment I expect to get when Digital Whiteness and Medieval Studies (forthcoming, ArcPress/WMU) comes out as it discusses online white supremacy (white supremacists/white nationalists/KKK/MRA etc.).”

 

§ See also:

¶ DK mentioned: Being Black at Michigan

¶ stablish a Social Media Policy, SCS

¶ Rebecca Mead, “The Troll Slayer, A Cambridge classicist takes on her sexist detractors,” The New Yorker, Sept. 1, 2014.

¶ Mary Beard, “Women in Power”

¶ Sarah E. Bond, “Why we need to start seeing the Classical world in color,” Hyperallergic, June 7, 2017.

“Most museums and art history textbooks contain a predominantly neon white display of skin tone when it comes to classical statues and sarcophagi. This has an impact on the way we view the antique world. The assemblage of neon whiteness serves to create a false idea of homogeneity — everyone was very white! — across the Mediterranean region. The Romans, in fact, did not define people as “white”; where, then, did this notion of race come from?”

¶ Colleen Flaherty, “Threats for what she didn’t say,” Inside Higher Ed, June 19, 2017.

§ Pedagogical take-aways:

¶ Be patient, be diligent, teach awareness, have their back, support

9/20/17

More on canva.com:

Teaching materials

 

Other tools:

data.chronicle.com — for displaying date…and possibly adding data.

storymap — part of knight lab

storyline

Geosheets.com

Mapping Gothic France

 

For next week:

Troy’s Vision Statement

Mission of the Liberal Arts and Public Institutions: Roads Taken, Kid for Life

Changing nature of public and private

Changing role of public scholars

Moya, “The Ethics of Public Scholarship”

 

For the future:

Where is the internet?

Physicality of data?

Embodiment/Disembodiment

 

For today:

Digital Knowledge Faculty Initiative

The Work of Being Watched, Mark Andrejevic

“Recent developments in television technology can perhaps provide a more concrete example of how the work of being watched is deployed to rationalize the work of watching.” p. 239

Elahi Hasan

Tracking Transience — cannot copy link

Baltimore Sun

TED Talk — cannot copy link

The Circle (excerpt attached from Martha)

 

 

Tools 9/13/17

Canva.com — for designing; completely free; can download as a pdf.

TheNounProject.com — icons for everything

Pixlr.com — PhotoShop-lite

Unsplash — for photos, free, public domain images

DS106 — assignment bank

HERA: Historic Environment Resource Assessment, HISP UMW

H5P.com — a collection of tools that help you with other site.

H5P examples

knightlab.northwestern.edu — Juxtapose, Soundcite (add sound), Storymap (no collaboration), Timeline (create a Google spreadsheet; can collaborate with this); tools built for journalists

“It’s not the technology…it’s the teaching.” This isn’t always the case.

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World

For 9/13/17

Werner Herzog

“Will our children’s children’s children need the company of humans, or will they have evolved in a world where that’s not important?”

Lawrence Krauss, Cosmologist, Arizona State University

Teaching students to live with ambiguity

How does having the internet change our expectations of students?

Storytelling

“the web students bring me”

Sign up for a new app

Readings for 8/30/17

First meeting of Digital Knowledge, Domain of One’s Own, DTLT:

Is digital changing everything, or is knowledge changing the digital?

Art history reading on digital art history?

Domain Fellows, started by Martha Burtis – take DoOO out of the classroom and into their lives.

Ray Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains.” http://schoolsites.schoolworld.com/schools/Cheltenham/webpages/cmanser/files/there%20will%20come%20soft%20rains%20(bradbury)1.pdf

See also Bradbury’s  The Veldt The World the Children Made, first published in The Saturday Evening Post, September 23, 1950.

Audry Watters, The Web We Need to Give Students.” https://brightreads.com/the-web-we-need-to-give-students-311d97713713

An outsider looking in.

“Giving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.” Why is this radical?

David Weinberger, Small Pieces Loosley Joined (2002). http://www.smallpieces.com/

Werner Herzog, Lo and Behold, documentary.